rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his

android 2.3 >android 9.0>2021欧洲杯买球正规平台
ios 12.0

2021欧洲杯买球正规平台

时间:2021-07-31
语言:简体中文
普通下载 安全下载

安全下载  *安全、高速、稳定、防劫持、防病毒*

应用有被劫持的风险,可能出现广告、病毒、扣费等风险状况,建议使用豌豆荚安全下载。

简介

rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,欧洲杯比赛下注rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture hisrouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his

rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,欧洲杯比赛在哪买球rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his买球欧洲杯下单

rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,欧洲杯2020rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his

rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,2021欧洲杯在线投注,bob综合rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his

rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his,2021欧洲杯投注网rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his欧洲杯外围网址,rouble and a half." "Give me four roubles for it, I shall redeem it, it was my father's. I shall be getting some money soon." "A rouble and a half, and interest in advance, if you like!" "A rouble and a half!" cried the young man. "Please yourself"- and the old woman handed him back the watch. The young man took it, and was so angry that he was on the point of going away; but checked himself at once, remembering that there was nowhere else he could go, and that he had had another object also in coming. "Hand it over," he said roughly. The old woman fumbled in her pocket for her keys, and disappeared behind the curtain into the other room. The young man, left standing alone in the middle of the room, listened inquisitively, thinking. He could hear her unlocking the chest of drawers. "It must be the top drawer," he reflected. "So she carries the keys in a pocket on the right. All in one bunch on a steel ring.... And there's one key there, three times as big as all the others, with deep notches; that can't be the key of the chest of drawers... then there must be some other chest or strong-box... that's worth knowing. Strong-boxes always have keys like that... but how degrading it all is." The old woman came back. "Here, sir: as we say ten copecks the rouble a month, so I must take fifteen copecks from a rouble and a half for the month in advance. But for the two roubles I lent you before, you owe me now twenty copecks on the same reckoning in advance. That makes thirty-five copecks altogether. So I must give you a rouble and fifteen copecks for the watch. Here it is." "What! only a rouble and fifteen copecks now!" "Just so." The young man did not dispute it and took the money. He looked at the old woman, and was in no hurry to get away, as though there was still something he wanted to say or to do, but he did not himself quite know what. "I may be bringing you something else in a day or two, Alyona Ivanovna- a valuable thing- silver- a cigarette box, as soon as I get it back from a friend..." he broke off in confusion. "Well, we will talk about it then, sir." "Good-bye- are you always at home alone, your sister is not here with you?" He asked her as casually as possible as he went out into the passage. "What business is she of yours, my good sir?" "Oh, nothing particular, I simply asked. You are too quick.... Good-day, Alyona Ivanovna." Raskolnikov went out in complete confusion. This confusion became more and more intense. As he went down the stairs, he even stopped short, two or three times, as though suddenly struck by some thought. When he was in the street he cried out, "Oh, God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly.... No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!" he added resolutely. "And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of. Yes, filthy above all, disgusting, loathsome, loathsome!- and for a whole month I've been...." But no words, no exclamations, could express his agitation. The feeling of intense repulsion, which had begun to oppress and torture his

  • 软件类别:游戏类目
  • 软件语言:简体中文
  • 软件大小:34852M
  • 更新时间:2021-07-31
  • 运行环境:ios 12.4

同类推荐

  • 最新软件排行
  • 最热软件排行
  • 评分最高软件
  • 热搜     |     排行     |     热点     |     话题     |     标签

    Copyright & 2012-2021 112666.ju9l.cn

    友情链接: 欧洲杯外围网址 欧洲杯外围网址 欧洲杯外围网址 2021欧洲杯投注网 【欧洲杯指定网投】
    网站地图 android 4.3 linux -1 ios 12.2 2021欧洲杯买球正规平台